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Delicious

Day 27 - How Many Calories Should You Eat Every Day?

With obesity spreading across the planet like wildfire, there has been a shift from nourishment toward eating based on caloric intake. Indeed even many doctors today believe that calories are the primary concern with what we eat — not fat, protein, carbohydrates or even vitamins and minerals. There are so many things that food will or won’t do for us. But what are calories and how do we get them to work for us, not against us? You know the drill…

Chestnut Crepe Recipe

Check out this simple crepe recipe I made the other day. It’s just 2 cups chestnut flour, 2 eggs, 1 1/2 cups milk and 2 Tablespoons of melted butter whisked. Let sit for 20 minutes and then pour into a hot non-PFOA, non-stick skillet by the 1/2 cupful to make delicious crepes. The filling here is the same sauteed apples with cream we saw from the other day. Yum!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 10 - Raging Stool

The environment within our bodies is the most important one for warding off disease. Yet we are rarely encouraged to nurture it. This video will explain the biggest threat to your immune system, as well as a major cause of both diabetes and cancer. See how the Reset Your Body Health Challenge will help correct the problem. The power is always within your hands to heal your body with this protocol.

The other day, a member of the challenge was inquiring about my recipe for the spinach omelet I ate last week. To tell the truth, I’ve been making it for over 20 years and have to kind of eyeball the method every time I make it depending on quality of the spinach, and size of the eggs. Sometimes I use fresh spinach, when I get enough from our co-op, but otherwise, I will use frozen as spinach can be a pain to clean and fresh in the supermarket is often tasteless. In any case, here’s the recipe for:

Spanish-style Spinach Omelet

1 10 oz. package of frozen, chopped spinach, thawed

3 Tbs extra virgin olive oil or 2 Tbs. lard (lard makes a naturally non-stick surface)

1 clove garlic, chopped fine

8 large eggs

sea salt to taste

Heat a medium-sized cast iron or ceramic non-stick frying pan, then add oil or lard until melted. Add garlic and sauté for 30 seconds before adding spinach. Cook spinach until all excess water has evaporated. Meanwhile in a bowl, beat eggs and salt together. When the spinach is dry enough, lift it out of the pan and add to the bowl with the eggs. If frying pan seems too dry, add a bit more olive oil or lard to coat. When hot, but not smoking, add egg and spinach mixture to the pan. As the bottom layer cooks, gently create pockets in the egg so that the uncooked egg can move to the bottom. When omelet is fairly solid, place a plate (at least the same size as the frying pan) over the top and invert the frying pan. Then gently slide the omelet back into the frying pan (add more oil or lard if necessary) to cook the other side. Alternately, if the handle of your frying pan can handle it, place the frying pan into the broiler (grill) for 5 minutes or so to cook the top of the omelet.

This omelet can easily be made with cauliflower as well. Simply use 10 oz of frozen cauliflower, cook and chop fine before adding to the eggs.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 6 - What You Don't Know About Fats

Poor fat. It is the most misunderstood macronutrient. Food processors and even the government love the fact that you’re totally confused about fats to the point that you’ll eat not food instead. In this video, I talk about which fats are most important for your health and which ones contribute to nearly every disease imaginable from allergies and arthritis to cancer and autism.

In case you’re wondering, today I ate some leftover meatloaf, roast lamb with string beans, steak tartare, tuna, broth (really leftover gravy) and introduced winter squash to my evening meal. So far, so good. My energy is high and I feel super-focused. I may even decide to go to bed a bit early tonight.

Now if only today’s video will upload so that I can append it here. Ah… there it goes.

Here’s a little eye candy too. It’s a Spanish potato omelet. I’m not eating potatoes yet, but it looks a lot like my cauliflower omelet that I made for breakfast the other day. I just don’t have a picture of the cauliflower one, so this will have to suffice.

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About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 5 - Making Progress

Only day 5 into the Challenge and already, I’m experiencing phenomenal changes in some health problems I’ve been experiencing since getting Dengue Fever in 2009 and an accident early in 2012. All the chiropractic and acupuncture was pretty ineffective without making these changes in my eating. Find out what kinds of benefits you can expect on the Reset Your Body Health Challenge.

So what did I eat today? Cauliflower omelet for breakfast, almond crackers, and meatloaf with sautéed cabbage for dinner. I used my own homemade ketchup for the dressing made from tomato paste. I also introduced carrots which were in the meatloaf and used dried leeks in place of breadcrumbs to keep it moist.

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Gotta run. Baby wants to exercise.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 4 - Handling Your Off Days

Today we had a family event to attend. I didn’t prepare as well as I could have, but I survived without betraying all the work I’ve done so far in the Challenge. Here are some tips you may not have heard about eating out and sticking to any diet or health challenge.

So what did I eat at the restaurant? Steamed fish and lobster, a slice of steak, string beans, seaweed salad and a scallop. Pretty basic, not many seasonings on the food. I was very satisfied at the end of the meal. So now it’s time to get back on the wagon.

Back tomorrow with more!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Foie Gras: The Truth behind the Delicacy

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One food that I was excited (yes, I said excited) to see in St. Martin was foie grasFoie gras has gotten a lot of bad press over the years because several special interest groups have decided to target this tiny cottage industry over a lack of understanding the anatomy and feeding habits of geese in the wild as well as the desire to feel powerful and self-righteous in shutting down a few mom and pop operations while battery farms and experiments on children run rampant. It’s a matter of focusing on what one feels is right or wrong, which always leads to pain and suffering for the one casting stones.  It’s a shame.

The reason why people say they are so opposed to the practice of eating or raising foie gras is because it involves a process called gavage or force-feeding a goose or duck to fatten its liver. What is not understood is that these animals “force feed” themselves in nature! In fact, anyone who has seen the gavage performed will notice that the geese clamor around the farmer, knocking one another over, to get to the good stuff! The lies about geese being nailed to the ground are the fabrication of people who have never been anywhere near a real foie gras  farm.

Another concern is that the animal is choking during the process. Remember, we are talking about geese here, not humans, cats, dogs or any other mammal. Geese do not breathe and eat from the same opening. The tube leading to the stomach is much larger than and next to the pulmonary opening.

I have visited many of these farms in Quebec and I can tell you that geese raised for foie gras are the healthiest, cleanest and most respected farm animals I have ever seen. They have tons of space to roam on grass and get plenty of sun — unlike their factory, organic or cage-free chicken cousins. When the gavage happens, it is very quick and happens in the blink of an eye (literally), so there is no lengthy process involved.

And what about the health repercussions? I have never seen an obese foie gras producer. I’m not saying they don’t exist, but they seem to live to an old age, without the signs of advanced aging I notice in the average yogini, and they tend to be very lean. Makes ya think.

The final point I’d like to raise is that there are approximately only 100,000 geese and ducks raised for foie gras every year. Meanwhile, there are over 9 BILLION chickens raised in horrifying conditions such as being boxed in tiny crates, engineered so their legs would break if they walk, de-clawing, de-beaking etc. Yet, many people who are trying to get legislation passed to shut down these small farms would gladly go to the local diner, restaurant or even places like Whole Foods and purchase conventionally raised or so-called cage-free chicken and eggs and not think twice about their decision. (Cage free only means that the animal is still locked in a filthy barn, but just not in a cage) So before we point fingers at one another and try to claim dietary superiority to one another, we must know all of the background and make rational decisions that do not involve our egos.

So even though French people in France are starting to give into irrational, misguided pressure from fanatical groups, it was a real pleasure to see people on St. Martin buying all forms of duck and goose — including foie gras. I just hope they don’t lose their culture and tradition as so many have in the name of self-righteousness.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Christmas Dinner in St. Martin

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Yesterday was Christmas. We spent a lovely day without going anywhere. Well, it would’ve been a much more lovely day if the neighbor’s mom didn’t crash into our rental car. We’ll get it all sorted out in the morning, so I’ll have to let you know how it turns out then.

Anyway, this is the second Christmas that we have spent in the tropics and I hope this is the trend as I plan to move to Hawaii before next winter hits.

We spent the morning having a leisurely breakfast on the porch and then until about 2 pm by the pool. Unfortunately due to the high winds and rain of the past few days the water was really cold — no wonder nobody was swimming in there!

After taking a nap with the baby, I started on dinner — a seared duck breast cooked with a cider cream sauce and mushrooms served with mashed taro root. YUM!

Here’s how you make it:

Score the fat side of the duck breast taking care not to cut the meat. I like to do parallel lines in two directions so as to make diamond shapes in the fat. Season with sea salt and cracked black pepper to taste.

In a large frying pan, sear the duck breast fat side down for about 5-7 minutes until nearly all the fat has been rendered from the skin. Drain of the fat and SAVE IT!* Next, flip the breast over to the meat side and cook for a further 5-7 minutes. Remove to plate and keep warm with the fat side up to keep the meat from drying out. In the pan, add a tablespoon of butter and 8 ounces of quartered button mushrooms. Turn up heat and cook briefly on all sides. Remove to plate with duck on it. Then add the thinly sliced white part of one leek to the frying pan. Cook for one minute, then deglaze the pan with 1 cup of medium dry sparkling apple cider, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the frying pan. Allow sauce to reduce by half then add 1/2 cup heavy cream or crème fraîche to pan. Continue to reduce stirring occasionally until sauce coats the back of a spoon.

Return duck and mushrooms to pan. Coat them with sauce and adjust seasoning. Serve hot and enjoy!

*This will taste delicious in sauteed potatoes, stir fries, fried eggs or anywhere where people are normally told to use vegetable oil. There are a few distinct differences however. First, like lard, duck fat creates a natural non-stick surface in your pan. Second, it is light just like lard so it help you burn fat and will nourish your cells. In fact, poultry fat is a powerful immune system booster! Third, just like lard (again) it does not absorb into foods easily so you will use considerably less of it than you would of any vegetable oils. So if you insist on calorie counting, then use animal fats in cooking, not rancid vegetable oils!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.