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Exercise

Guest Heretic Jenn Scribner, GAPS Practitioner and owner of Body Wisdom Nutrition

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Jenn Scribner on the Nutrition Heretic podcast Despite offering a wide array of delicious foods to eat, many people find the GAPS Nutritional Protocol extremely challenging. I’m one of them. After going through the training and protocol herself, Jenn Scribner and a fellow GAPS practitioner teamed up to offer group GAPS coaching to help people stay on the diet with a low pressure approach. Listen in to find out how Jenn stuck to the protocol and how failing isn’t as easy as you might think.

Jennifer Scribner is a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, Restorative Wellness Practitioner, and Certified GAPS™ Practitioner. Her specialty is helping people learn and follow the GAPS Diet to address autism and complex digestive and autoimmune conditions.   She is one of the first Certified GAPS™ Practitioners trained by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride in September 2011.  Her other passions include her family, Hello Kitty, and plotting how she can move to Hawaii.

If you’re new to the GAPS Diet, grab a copy of her simple explanation in the FREE e-book, The GAPS Diet in a Nutshell, on her website, Body Wisdom Nutrition.  You can also find Jenn on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Highlights from today's episode on the GAPS Diet:

  • 03:56 ~ How is your program different than following the book?
  • 05:59 ~ Why did Adrienne find this diet so difficult?
  • 16:16 ~ How do you keep the diet interesting — especially in the beginning stages?
  • 22:25 ~ What was your journey to coaching people with the GAPS protocol?
  • 32:21 ~ Why is it OK to have fruit and even honey on this diet?
  • 60:50 ~ How can people keep from feeling imprisoned by their diet?
  • 41:56 ~ What is the most common way that most people fail?
  • 53:17 ~ How exercise fits into the GAPS diet.

Other links mentioned in this GAPS interview:

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

All About Weight On This Week's Q & A

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Your Questions About Weight Loss Answered!This week's Q & A is all about weight and weight loss.  Does body type have anything to do with it?  Can the order in which you eat your food during your meals make a difference to your hunger satiation?  Are enriched products good for you; what do they really contain?  What does trauma have to do with weight loss or gain?  And there's plenty of talk about parasites!

Tune in to hear this week's questions about weight loss:

  1. Is it about calories in vs. calories out?
  2. What is most important: quality ingredients or quality diet? Meaning avoiding bad stuff but maybe not eating organic.
  3. What do you do with an eleven-year-old who is always hungry?
  4. I can't seem to shed weight even though I think I eat well.
  5. The role of physical activity in weight loss is also touched on, and will be explored further in a future Q&A (you can also listen to this episode that also talks about it)

 

What is the Weekly Q&A?

Each week between podcast seasons Adrienne hosts a FB Live event to answer your questions.

Can't make it live?  Sign up for email alerts and get reminders direct to your inbox when episodes are posted on our website and YouTube channel.  And follow us on iTunes and Stitcher to listen on-the-go.  While you’re there, be sure to leave a rating and review!

How To Have Your Questions Answered

Email us at stjllc.cs@gmail.com with your questions or suggestions for upcoming Q&A events.  Be sure to use Weekly Q&A in the subject line.

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

It's a New Year and it's time to try something new and branch out!  The Nutrition Heretic podcast team is working hard behind the scenes to bring you even more awesome guests in the year ahead, as well as a few surprises!  

Weekly Q & A: Have Your Questions Answered!

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Weekly Q & A: Have Your Questions Answered on the Nutrition Heretic!It's a New Year and it's time to try something new and branch out.  The Nutrition Heretic podcast team is working hard behind the scenes to bring you even more awesome guests in the year ahead, as well as a few surprises! On this first Weekly Q & A, Adrienne is thankful for her listeners, and shares the exciting news about her most popular book (hint: it's something to crow about).

Tune in to hear the first Weekly Q & As:

  • What is the first dietary change the Nutrition Heretic recommends.
  • What is the best/fastest way to repair gut health.
  • What Adrienne thinks about exercise for weight loss.

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

Cleaning Up Our Body Care; Leah E. McCullough, The Fibro Lady - Part II

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Leah McCullough, Fibrolady's interview with Nutrition Heretic In the last episode, we discussed Leah McCullough’s miraculous recovery from fibromyalgia. Today we continue our discussion with her strategies to ease into healing even if you can’t get out of bed and external factors you can add to your protocol that will take your healing to the next level.

If you'd like more information, visit Leah's website, Leah E. McCullough or follow her on Facebook.

 

 

Highlights from today's episode:

5:40 ~ The importance of improving your external environment.

15:40 ~ Why exercise could delay healing.

27:53 ~ Questions from listeners.

36:40 ~ 5 Simple ways to reduce and sooth fibromyalgia pain now

Freedom From Fibromyalgia: 7 Steps To Complete Recovery by Leah E. McCullough is available on Amazon! Get a copy for you or someone you know that is ready for action.

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

Unnecessary Surgeries; Guest Tudor Pangal Author of Back Pain: How I Got Rid of It After Suffering For 20 Years

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Unnecessary Surgeries; Guest Tudor Pangal Author of Back Pain: How I Got Rid of It After Suffering For 20 Years Do you really need drastic surgery to fix your pain or are there other factors and alternatives to consider? We also look at statin drugs and what negative affects they may have on users. The truth is that every cell in your body needs cholesterol (there is no such thing as good and bad), especially as it ages and that limiting it has everything to do with declining brain function.

Author Tudor Pangal joins us to discuss how he overcame crippling back pain without surgery by taking a holistic approach to treating his chronic pain. Your mind and attitude plays a big roll in dealing with such pain and so does your lifestyle. Tudor explains how after 20 years of terrible back pain he came to the realization that he could overcome it with the right exercise and just as importantly, the right mindset.

Tudor shares some wonderful stories about using inversion and table tennis and how working on your legs, makes a guy's butt look better -- it's in his books, Back Pain: How I Got Rid of It After Suffering For 20 Years! and  We did NOT make that one up!

As well, we answer the pressing question: Is it OK to leap over a net in table tennis?

Don't forget to share the podcast with your friends and leave a review on Stitcher or iTunes!

And check out Tudor's other book in the series, Heal Your Back Pain: The Complete Roadmap - Mind, Nutrition, Exercise.

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

Day 15 - Are you running for your life?

When you’ve had something banged into your head over and over until you’ve submitted, it’s hard to accept that you may have been steered wrong. Keep in mind that perhaps a few people do thrive on this advice, but I’ve seen too many health complications such as infertility, substance addiction, weight gain and even heart attacks and cancers result from the belief that doing this will miraculously infuse your body with health despite a less than stellar diet. Watch now to see why you may need to cut back or cut it out altogether!

I have one yoga video that I bought in Hawaii that is totally awesome for oxygenating the body and helping you to stretch farther. Unfortunately, it is currently out of print. I’ll keep an eye out for you though. There is a book that my friend, Debbie, turned me on to several years ago that explains the science of breathing and gives some cool exercises to do as well. Just 5-10 minutes per day can make you feel like a new person! I found it here:


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

The Myth of Moderation

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Moderation is a term that is often bandied about by people when they no longer understand what to eat. Unfortunately, this approach to eating fails nearly 100% of the time.

My grandfather was the first person I had ever hear use the saying. He was born in the West Indies in the late 1800s. To him moderation meant eating his meals made from whole ingredients such as meat (including seafood and chicken), vegetables, bread, rice, fruit, dairy and tea. Snacks, desserts and alcohol were occasional indulgences mainly reserved for birthday parties, weddings and holidays.

To him, moderation also meant living moderately. He didn’t perform any extreme sports or go to the gym. He took walks when he needed to get somewhere. He didn’t smoke, but was not paranoid to be in the company of someone who was. He took life in stride, was never sick a day in his life and lived to be 103.

The next person to give me the moderation speech was 37 years old. She was 60 lbs overweight, avoided red meat, ate cup of soups and other processed foods for most of her meals, snacked throughout the days on various confections and ate a half dozen Dunkin Donuts and large coffee with extra low fat milk and several packets of sugar every morning for breakfast. She was a runner and contracted every disease and illness that circulated. Unfortunately, this is how the vast majority of people interpret “everything in moderation.”

The reason why some people feel this is living moderately is because they are so confused by the messages we receive from the media. We are continually told that meat and fat are bad. Then the same “nutritional experts” find every excuse possible to let us know that we need to include chocolate, coffee, red wine and processed soy foods into our diets. They claim that the only reason our ancestors thrived on high quality protein such as meat and saturated fats is because they were constantly on the move. Yet there is so much missing from this misguided information!

True, few of our ancestors sat behind a desk, but relatively few of them performed intense physical activity all day long either. Energy was often expended in short spurts followed by long periods of down time spent communing with others. Today, however, the “moderationists” feel that we can somehow exercise all the nutrients that are missing from our diets into our bodies. This is impossible. Only foods that have co-existed with humans since the dawn of our species can do this. There is no factory, no exercise, no substitute to match nature’s elements.

So if you want to live in moderation to protect your health, eat like our ancestors. They had the blueprint for good health. True there were famines and other scourges that often took them in the prime of life, but those who escaped such an end routinely lived to be 90 years and older. They did not succumb to cancer, heart disease or complications of diabetes.

To this satisfying diet, add your exercise, your spirituality, and other components of a healthy lifestyle. It is proven that all of these elements go hand in hand, but it is difficult to have the lifestyle when the diet is not congruent.

There are far more elements to consider to determining exactly how to proceed with a healthy diet. They will be gradually revealed to you as you browse the pages of this site.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

The Best Pre-Pregnancy Exercise

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As a former belly dancer, people (both men and women) were always in awe that my husband “allowed me” to “dance for other men.” This is where their belly dance education began.

The term ‘belly dance’ is a distortion of the Arabic term raqs al baladi, meaning ‘dance of the people.’ When a dancer named Little Egypt performed at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, Victorian audiences were appalled by her rapid hip movements and uncorseted (although fully clothed) body and determined that baladi simply meant ‘belly’. And so the term ‘belly dance’ was born.

Although the origins of belly dance are not completely known, historians agree that it is not an uncontrolled hoochie coochie dance that enslaved women performed for the sexual pleasure of their masters. Rather, the art of belly dance is considered a social tradition performed by both men and women for weddings and festivals. In the Middle East and Northern Africa, the sexes often celebrated events separately. Therefore, men danced for men and women danced for women.

In family circles, it is said that mothers, aunts and female friends would perform various movements to show a young bride which muscles would be useful in childbirth. For example, hip twists, lifts and drops would loosen the pelvic floor. Abdominal undulations would help a woman push the baby out. In short, belly dance may have been one of the earliest forms of Lamaze. Judging from my 55 minute labor, I would say that these movements are very effective too!

In my recent pregnancy this year, I pushed my baby out within 2 minutes! Quite literally, I got the urge to push, which broke my water, called the midwife and by the time she got on the phone the baby was completely out and crying! Luckily my husband was awake to deliver her.

But back to the story of belly dance, even in the sultan’s harem (the women’s quarters in the palace), women performed the dance for one another to pass the time away. It was a form of entertainment by women for women in a time when illiteracy was widespread. Surely these women also noticed its advantages in childbirth as well as some sultans were known to have dozens of children.

To thousands of modern belly dancers across the globe, raqs al baladi is a sacred, empowering dance. It represents a sisterhood that all women share by connecting us to our earthy past and honoring us as creators of the future. When we choose to dance for men, it is not to submit, but to let them know who is really in charge!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

How do the French stay so skinny?

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Let me start by saying that there  is no French paradox. Red wine will not unclog your arteries. Plenty of real fats — including the animal fats — minus an abundance of refined sugars will.

The French start the day with coffee (no cream or milk usually), yogurt, cheese, pâté, butter and baguette for breakfast. A piece of fruit (some berries, an apple, orange or pear) is also common, but rarely eaten alone. Occasionally a soft boiled egg is eaten time permitting. More recently, people will eat Muesli type cereals.

For lunch, a salad with meat, egg, tuna, etc is common as are things like steak frites (steak with fries) or an omelette with cheese, ham and fries. If you can’t sit down, you’ll probably get this served on half a baguette (but your waistline will pay for it!) or stop at a baker to pick up a quiche, pizza or croissant sandwich. But these bakery items are usually an accompaniment to a big salad.  Sausages are eaten in some locations as well popular in some areas as well.

Dinner will likely depend on your schedule. If you work a 9-5 job, you’ll make dinner the biggest meal of the day. Otherwise, lunch is. If you eat in a restaurant, you might start with a nourishing soup, then move on to a slice of fish, frog legs, another steak or a chicken preparation. One of my favorite soups I enjoyed in Paris many years ago was made from pâté. Yum! At home, you may also begin with a soup followed by a simple chicken or fish dish or swap them both for a hearty stew and a salad. Mashed potatoes made with real butter and cream are also favorites on the French dinner table. When bread is eaten, it is usually a very small piece used to sop up the gravies on your plate or soup left in the bowl. In essence it is a way to get more fat soluble vitamins into your body.

Fruit is a typical dessert. Sometimes served with a little cheese. Sometimes cheese instead of fruit. Cakes and pies are generally reserved for the special occasions. A birthday party, anniversary, holiday, out-of-town visitor…. Not everyday and not as snacks.

The last time I was in France 5 years ago, I found that there are far more obese people. Many of these people seemed to believe what the Americans do which is that obesity is controlled by exercise alone. Meanwhile, many of them were eating lots of empty carbs including desserts whether it was in a restaurant or on a street, while their skinnier friends were eating salads, meat, cheese or nothing at all. So in effect, as the French (Italians, Spaniards, Germans etc) begin to follow our lead, little by little they too begin fighting the battle of the bulge. In effect it was indeed the presence of these delicious fats and animal foods that made the French live long as well. But in this too, we sadly begin to see a rapid decline. The take home message is that exercise is good, but it cannot replace real food.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.