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Flight

What Can You Take on Your Flight

What Can You Take on Your Flight

What Can You Take on Your Flight

Going on a flight overseas is especially different these days because of the flight restrictions since 9/11. Just know that you still have lots of options, even if you’re dealing with food restrictions. Here are things I would suggest to have on-hand:

  • Meals and some snacks for any flight lasting more than 3 hours. You may not think you’ll eat that much, but better safe than sorry. Airplane food is gross and should not be eaten if you care about your health. Remember, you’ll have to be to your flight at least an hour early and depending on where you live, you may be traveling for quite a distance to get there. The typical options I might bring would be a sandwich, Jamaican beef patties, nuts and dried fruit, granola, cracklings, nitrate-free salami or ham (pre-sliced), slices of hard cheese (soft cheese or butter may be confiscated as a gel/cream!), a piece of fruit etc. Of course as many of these as possible should be homemade, but definitely choose items you’d feel comfortable bringing in a plastic bag (and at room temperature for many hours) for the inspectors to see. Bring enough for the whole family. I travel to Europe typically, so bringing food for dinner and again something for breakfast is crucial.

  • A tiny bottle of lotion. No more than 3 oz. to comply with flight restrictions. Airplanes are dry and you’ll appreciate it come morning.

  • A toothbrush. Even if you don’t think you’ll sleep on the plane, a toothbrush can be a welcome thing after several hours in the dry stagnant air of the plane.

  • Warm clothing. I don’t care if it’s the middle of the summer and 110 degrees where you live. The plane will get cold at some point and those little blankets they give you don’t cover jack! A sweater or jacket is good and wear jeans or something long on your legs if possible.

  • Games, books, computer, puzzles, or a craft. You’ll need something to do and often the movie screen in front of you will malfunction or someone has already done the crossword in the in-flight magazine, so be prepared for downtime and make the best use of that time with a project to keep you busy.

  • Medications or necessary supplements. If you have a condition that requires medication or supplements, make sure you bring enough for the plane. You can pack it in a baggie. Even if you don’t, some people find a megadose of high quality vitamin C such as amalaki powder mixed into water (the flight attendant will have bottled water) is good for keeping any viruses circulating on the plane in check.

  • If you’re traveling with small children, make sure they have all of the above. In addition, don’t forget to pack things such as diapers if they’re really young (ours sat on a chair near the front door at home the first time we traveled with our daughter — not fun trying to find diapers in rural France on a Sunday where everything was closed — luckily we found one Arabic store opened).

  • If you are breastfeeding your child, nursing him or her during take-off is a good way to prevent their ears from clogging. As a last resort, if they are old enough, chewing a piece of gum during take off (and then promptly spitting it out after a few minutes)

What not to bring on your flight?

  • Leave your knives at home. When I went to Jamaica, somehow I went there and came back with a small pocket knife in my purse (didn’t know it was there until I got home). If you need one when you get to the other side, pack it in your checked luggage.

  • More than 3 oz. of liquids, creams or gels. Hotel-sized bottles are great for lotion and any other small amounts of liquid or cream you may need.

  • When returning to the US, make sure that any food you purchase for the flight is consumed before landing on US soil. The American government does not want fresh food of any kind coming onto American soil. (And they can’t figure out why degenerative disease is so rampant!) You may laugh, but I once ended up on a “contaminated” line and had all my bags scanned when I declared a pear from France that I had forgotten to eat. Their high tech equipment for disposing of the offending fruit was a garbage can with a Hefty bag in it.

This should pretty much sum up what you can take on your flight. If I haven’t covered something, drop me a line. I’ll be glad to update the page with answers to your questions.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

My $2000 GPS: Why You Need Travel Insurance

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Last year my family decided to go to Spain to visit a friend I hadn’t seen for nearly 20 years. Amazingly we found a flight, not only direct from NYC to Malaga — a relatively obscure destination for most Americans, but we found those tickets for only $550 each! This was over $400 off of the normal price for tickets to Spain.

The one glitch? The website I bought the tickets through didn’t offer any kind of insurance at checkout.

Interestingly enough, I had recently been investing in the additional $20 or whatever price it is on every trip I had bought online over the past few years.

Even though it wasn’t offered, I kept saying to myself that I’d purchase the insurance before the trip. Unfortunately, a string of bad events kept me from making that purchase.

First, I got MSG poisoning on my trip to Jamaica 6 weeks earlier… and it lasted for 6 weeks. In fact I was only better at the beginning of the week that I was leaving for Spain.

Then my daughter got sick from swimming in a friend’s pool (they didn’t tell us that their kid had a virus!). So I spent the entire week before the trip, not only packing, but trying to nurse my child back to health.

Finally came the day of the trip. We planned 5 hours to get to the airport because driving into New York on a Friday afternoon in summer is sketchy. Even so, we had done the trip before and it only took 2 hours max.

We loaded into the car and got on the road. So exhausted from the week and lack of sleep the night before. I closed my eyes as my husband drove. As we got a few miles away from New York — TRAFFIC! Everything came to an almost complete stand still. I couldn’t believe it!

Instead of checking the directions the GPS was giving us and comparing it to the directions from the parking garage, we blindly followed the GPS directions which brought us right through New York City! Usually we go around through Staten Island, but by the time we had recognized the error — there was no turning back. There was no way to get off!

Finally, we arrived to the airport… ten minutes AFTER they closed the check-in counter! Needless to say, we were horrified.

So then, we spent the next THREE hours on a line for people who missed their flight — that didn’t even look that long when we got on it. When we got to the front of the line. The dude at the counter barely spoke English and his boss (an old black guy named Ivan) refused to sell us tickets for the following day’s flight for less than $3000 each — yes, that’s three THOUSAND! He gave us no compassion for having gotten stuck in 5 hours of traffic and could care less that he had us waiting on the line for 3 hours with a 5 year old. It was not 11pm and we didn’t even have a place to sleep that night!

I was so proud of my husband. He immediately called Delta’s customer service and explained the case to the agent and was able to procure 3 tickets for the next evenings flight for only $2000! I know this seems like a lot, but since we had gotten the first tickets so cheaply, this was a blessing because it still brought our tickets to a price similar to what most of the other people on the flight were probably paying.

So here are the lessons we learned from this experience:

1. ALWAYS get some kind of travel insurance that covers things like missed flights, lost baggage and health (especially if you’re doing any kind of adventure travel or are elderly). For a nominal fee, it can save you a lot of headaches.

2. NEVER trust your GPS! These can be handy devices (in fact, ours has European maps installed and helped us find the tiny street we were staying on in Granada), but often will not give you the best directions. Get MapQuest directions to compare or download directions from the destination you are going to (such as the airport).

3. If you miss your flight, get on the line designated for people who are stranded, but start calling customer service for your airline IMMEDIATELY. Try to do anything possible to avoid standing on line for three hours.

4. DON’T TAKE NO FOR AN ANSWER! You can always get a better deal if you have to deal with a belligerent  customer service agent.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.