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Food

Which Pesticides Are Safe?; André Leu, author of The Myths of Safe Pesticides and Member of the Monsanto Tribunal

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André Leu

André Leu

To say that no other company is as hated as Monsanto is an understatement. The Monsanto name is toxic, driving away consumers who point to products like RoundUp, glyphosate and numerous GMO crops for health disorders ranging from autism and alzheimers to gluten intolerance and cancers. Our guest heretic is André Leu, author of The Myths of Safe Pesticides and member of theMonsanto Tribunal andIFOAM Organics International. In today’s episode of the Nutrition Heretic Podcast, we discuss the faulty beliefs behind the safety of poisons, and why they wreak such havoc on our bodies.

Be sure to tune in next time for thesecond half of our discussion with André Leu.

Highlights from today's episode:

6:30 ~ How can we fight labelling laws?

9:16 ~ How did we get to this place where profits are worth more than health?

13:48 ~ The 5 main myths about pesticides and their safety.

17:54 ~ How Ethiopia is restoring vegetation and what caused East Africa to find itself in such poor state.

24:50 ~ Why even low doses of chemicals can cause permanent effects on reproduction and other diseases.

36:08 ~ Are the foxes are in charge of the chicken house when it comes to regulations?

43:10 ~ Effects chemicals have on the next generation - even before they are born.

56:10 ~ What can you eat without making yourself neurotic?  Find out how André does it.

Here are some of the resources mentioned during this episode for you to get more acquainted with this topic:

More episodes with André Leu:

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

The Real Reason People Go "Crazy"; Nourishing the Whole Self with Deborah Pell Yaffee

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The Real Reason People Go "Crazy"; Nourishing the Whole Self with Deborah Pell Yaffee If "science" doesn't know about a cure, does it really exist? In this episode, we learn how science is finally starting to catch up with the "quackery" of vitamins in fighting mental disorders and diseases.

Deborah Pell Yaffee has been a new age thinker longer than most of us have even been thinking about holistic health. Oddly enough, when people say, "it's all in your head", they are at least half right. Deborah helps us understand how we can get back to a healthier relationship with food and our bodies.

Deborah has a refreshing view on food, health and nutrition and how to make it all more "wholistic"!

Download Deborah's free gift: The HypnoChef’s ® Nutritional Cleansing Program For Body, Mind, and Spirit,

Deborah Yaffee, CH, CN is a Nutritionist and Certified Hypnosis Instructor in good standing with the National Guild of Hypnotists.  She integrates nutrition, hypnosis, energy psychology, Reiki, prayer and meditation into her consulting practice.  She is an experienced nutritional cleanse coach and enjoys serving clients worldwide via telephone sessions and email support.  Deborah is also a Senior Trainer with the Tai Chi for Health Institute.

You can contact her at her website: Labyrinth Life.

In this episode Adrienne and Deborah mentioned a couple of books about metabolism, if you're interested in finding out more, the links are below. And if you like belly dancing and want to dance to some of Adrienne's loved tunes, you'll enjoy the Best of George Abdo.

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

What's the Difference between a Dietitian and a Nutritionist?

N.B.: Before I describe the differences between a dietitian and a nutritionist, please note that this post is going to ruffle a lot of feathers. If you already feel that you know everything about nutrition or otherwise are prone to getting angry and lashing out, then you probably shouldn’t be surfing the web much less reading this blog. My comments here below are based upon my extensive experience in the field and are my opinion based upon keen observation.  They are not intended to belittle anyone for their choices or experiences.

The reason I am writing this post is because people continually approach me with get rich quick food related products that they would like me to sell. They assume that because I’m a nutritionist I would be interested in any kind of supplement or eating program that induces weight loss. It took some time, but I finally realized that those people don’t really know what I do. And if they don’t know, then it is likely that others are unaware of how I operate.

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist – Missing piece of the puzzle

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist – Missing piece of the puzzle

According to my reading and the experiences of my dietitian friends, a dietitian (R.D.) is a person trained in what I call the mathematics of food. This person is registered by the American dietetic Association, which is in fact run b by the food and drug administration, which is overseen by drug companies.

Is it any wonder that the food pyramid doesn’t work?The main concern  of dietitians is how many calories  and fat grams a person is consuming. In order to get my degree, I had to study one of their main textbooks and was appalled at the nourishing foods they suggested we should not eat to be healthy always in favor of something that had low calories, no fat, and often was highly processed – – even if it were synthetic sweeteners like aspartame or industrial oils like canola.

Unbeknownst to many, nutrition is not a regulated term. As such, the ADA has fought hard in several states to make its members the only food-related degree allowed to be called Nutritionist. This was particularly apparent on a recent trip to Florida where I visited my mother in a hospital and the staff dietitian had her on a weight loss diet that resulted in 20 pounds of weight loss in only three weeks. My mother is a tall woman and being forced down to 113 pounds so rapidly clearly was not an approach that concerned itself with her health.

Sadly, there are many people who use the title “nutritionist”, but have little more than a few broken theories and Mickey Mouse books (if any) under their belts. These people also tend to focus mainly on calories and fat grams. However, they also often endorse one of the many eating disorder style diets that confuse people even more. Just like with dietitians, these “nutritionists” are often primarily focused with weight loss as an indicator of overall health status.

But I don’t see it that way.

According to my training, nutrition is the practice of selecting specific nutrients and foods that support overall health. We were not all meant to be skin and bones. In fact, any doctor or other health care practitioner who looks in their files to do an overall assessment of their healthiest patients will find that those who carry “a little extra weight” are their healthiest clients.

Meanwhile, it is a little known fact that thin people often suffer from exactly the same diseases of excess as do the obese and in relatively the same numbers — even diabetes and heart disease!

To me, this is a liberating fact.

But it also allows me to focus on what is really important and why I got into this business in the first place. If anyone knows anything about me, I spent a lifetime fighting many seemingly irreversible health problems. The first half of my life was spent was spent trying to find relief from the nosebleeds, the eczema, the migraines, the erratic periods and so many other health problems that plagued me.

Sadly, the lose weight quick programs ignore the actual health problems with which people suffer. Some totally, while others assume that these types of issues will correct themselves once a sufficient amount of weight is lost. Nothing can be further from the truth.

In fact, focusing solely on weight very often increases health problems by starving the body of nutrients and depriving it of the fats that are often necessary to promote healing, while replacing them with all sorts of chemicals that are far worse for your health.

As a side note,  I have found it quite interesting that the majority of my dietitian friends who follow the ADA’s recommended diet suffer from obesity or significant digestive troubles since achieving their degrees. On the other hand, nearly all of my friends who subscribe to other variations of low-fat, no protein diets suffer from the same conditions and even worse. Many are unable to work because they are so sick and others have ended up with cancer. An alternative nutrition school in New York pumps these folks out by the hundreds every year.

The only dietitian friends who are healthy are

the ones who do not strictly tow the party line.

Sadly, they face expulsion and losing their credentials by doing so. I don’t know about you, but I do not think that our dietary choices and knowledge should be ruled by a totalitarian system.

I fully understand that I am probably shooting myself in the foot financially by not simply giving people what they think they want, however, I do believe that there are people on the planet were more concerned with feeling good from the inside and allowing the way to naturally fall off once the body has achieved balance.

In any case, I hope this little post clears up some questions you may have about why I don’t promote just anything and why I choose to focus on what to my mind nutrition is about. Again, this is not intended to offend anyone, but if you are offended, then perhaps I’ve done my job — to get you to think more about the sacred cows of nutrition.

Comments? Questions? I’d love to hear from you. Please drop a comment below!


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 29 - How Should I Feed My Kids?

One of the biggest myths going around is that children prefer different foods from adults. This belief has gotten us into hot water with allergies and autism rapidly rising across the industrialized world. Go to any La Leche League or Holistic Moms meeting and you’ll witness many patterns across children who suffer from such afflictions. What you are eating during the Challenge is in fact perfect for feeding your children as well. Don’t be surprised if you find their overall health, immunity and behavior to change for the better while eating along with you. Check out details in the video.

If your kids started out like most kids in the West, they have a penchant for sweet not-foods. Don’t dispair! Kids are often much easier than adults to switch over to a new way of eating — especially if they know it’s good for them. Here’s what you do:

1. Get them in the kitchen. Kids love science and to see how things are made. Have them chop, slice and mix according to age and capability. This will pay off when they are older and need to fend for themselves.

2. Stop focusing on reducing fat and calories. Kids need nutrients to grow and maintain their mental and physical health. Cook for flavor and nutrition first. The rest comes naturally.

3. Make real food fun. Just because you’re serving leg of lamb doesn’t mean that dinner can’t be more fun than a pizza (which coincidentally could be made healthy very easily). Here’s an idea. Have an Arabian nights party and serve sides of hummus, cucumber salad and pita bread. Then watch a cool kids movie like Aladdin. Believe me. It works!


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 16 - The Blessing Nobody Wants

It’s a diagnosis that everybody dreads. Most of us choose to live in denial about it or ignore it, often until it is too late to correct. Many others accept it and turn it into a religion — a way of segregating themselves from the rest of society. They set out on a mission to blame our ancestors for eating instinctually. However, this is one of the greatest blessings that we can experience. Instead of living in fear trying to patch up parts of our bodies that are faltering, wouldn’t it be nice to be blessed with an indicator that we should change course and do something we aren’t currently doing so that we can always possess the power to heal ourselves? Watch the video.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 10 - Raging Stool

The environment within our bodies is the most important one for warding off disease. Yet we are rarely encouraged to nurture it. This video will explain the biggest threat to your immune system, as well as a major cause of both diabetes and cancer. See how the Reset Your Body Health Challenge will help correct the problem. The power is always within your hands to heal your body with this protocol.

The other day, a member of the challenge was inquiring about my recipe for the spinach omelet I ate last week. To tell the truth, I’ve been making it for over 20 years and have to kind of eyeball the method every time I make it depending on quality of the spinach, and size of the eggs. Sometimes I use fresh spinach, when I get enough from our co-op, but otherwise, I will use frozen as spinach can be a pain to clean and fresh in the supermarket is often tasteless. In any case, here’s the recipe for:

Spanish-style Spinach Omelet

1 10 oz. package of frozen, chopped spinach, thawed

3 Tbs extra virgin olive oil or 2 Tbs. lard (lard makes a naturally non-stick surface)

1 clove garlic, chopped fine

8 large eggs

sea salt to taste

Heat a medium-sized cast iron or ceramic non-stick frying pan, then add oil or lard until melted. Add garlic and sauté for 30 seconds before adding spinach. Cook spinach until all excess water has evaporated. Meanwhile in a bowl, beat eggs and salt together. When the spinach is dry enough, lift it out of the pan and add to the bowl with the eggs. If frying pan seems too dry, add a bit more olive oil or lard to coat. When hot, but not smoking, add egg and spinach mixture to the pan. As the bottom layer cooks, gently create pockets in the egg so that the uncooked egg can move to the bottom. When omelet is fairly solid, place a plate (at least the same size as the frying pan) over the top and invert the frying pan. Then gently slide the omelet back into the frying pan (add more oil or lard if necessary) to cook the other side. Alternately, if the handle of your frying pan can handle it, place the frying pan into the broiler (grill) for 5 minutes or so to cook the top of the omelet.

This omelet can easily be made with cauliflower as well. Simply use 10 oz of frozen cauliflower, cook and chop fine before adding to the eggs.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 6 - What You Don't Know About Fats

Poor fat. It is the most misunderstood macronutrient. Food processors and even the government love the fact that you’re totally confused about fats to the point that you’ll eat not food instead. In this video, I talk about which fats are most important for your health and which ones contribute to nearly every disease imaginable from allergies and arthritis to cancer and autism.

In case you’re wondering, today I ate some leftover meatloaf, roast lamb with string beans, steak tartare, tuna, broth (really leftover gravy) and introduced winter squash to my evening meal. So far, so good. My energy is high and I feel super-focused. I may even decide to go to bed a bit early tonight.

Now if only today’s video will upload so that I can append it here. Ah… there it goes.

Here’s a little eye candy too. It’s a Spanish potato omelet. I’m not eating potatoes yet, but it looks a lot like my cauliflower omelet that I made for breakfast the other day. I just don’t have a picture of the cauliflower one, so this will have to suffice.

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About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 2 - What Should You Eat To Be Healthy?

In this video, I discuss the foods you need to eat to get healthy. This throws many people for a loop especially if they’ve spent several years believing that they are “in the know” about all matters of health. But I have to ask you, if you’re so convinced that you know exactly what you should be eating, then why are you still searching for answers? Enjoy the video and please leave me a comment below.

Here’s what I ate for breakfast:

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And this is what I ate for dinner:

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About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Where to Eat in St. Martin

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I was so happy that the food on St. Martin was mainly good. Once I realized that there is virtually no source of fresh water on the island, I was worried what that meant for my 2 week vacation. We are foodies in our family, so going somewhere that has awful food (like Holland or Portugal) would have been devastating.

But like I said, there is very little fresh water to be found on the island meaning that all water is treated or at least desalinated, but also meaning that there is very little farming going on as well. Sure, there are some cattle or goats here and there and coconut palms in various places, but anything you see for sale in any of the markets is shipped in from anywhere they can get it.

So let’s start with the markets. Throughout the island, you will get foods that are grown on other Caribbean islands such as mangoes, pineapples, bananas and various tubers. The Sunny Food supermarket, on the Dutch side around the corner from the Zoo, is considered to a great place for cheap prices and these traditional Caribbean foods including “ackee” the main ingredient in Jamaica’s national dish (I mention this here because it is illegal to get in the US although it’s not completely impossible to find here — so if you want a treat….).

The one market that I was really pissed I didn’t get to until a few days before I was leaving was the big Grand Marché — also on the Dutch side — a few miles south of Marigot. They had the best of the best of everything! Both French and Dutch products as well as specialty items. There was one bucket of some sweet French concoction I found in the liquor section. It said something about Grandmother’s recipe, which always gets me. I assume it was some kind of homemade condensed milk, but it didn’t have an ingredient list on it, so I have no idea, but I didn’t have enough time to finish it off, so I had to pass it up. The Grand Marché is known for having a great combination of prime selection, excellent quality and very good prices. Even though it is on the Dutch side, they have all the French specialties such as foie gras, confit de canard, French cheeses and French beer and wines too. Nice clean and bright store too!

On the French side of the island, you can also go to the US Market in Grand Case. They are expensive, but have good French food (avoid the mortadelle, which was really weird tasting for some reason). This is where we did most of our shopping as it was less than 5 minutes from our apartment in Baie Orientale. I liked the fact that you could buy real French meat there. They also sold American meat, which no doubt many people bought because it was cheap, but a good French steak or chicken can’t be beat. Unlike US “farmers” in France meat is raised for quality. In fact, with chickens, for example, they actually label them by how many days it takes to raise them — the longer the better. So they pride themselves in the fact that it takes 90 days to raise a chicken whereas in the states, we want them raised in under 6 weeks — a practice that involves not only cooping chickens up in disgusting little boxes, but feeding them nothing but hormones in the form of GMO corn and soy. Yuck! but I digress…

Don’t think you’ll get a better deal from the small markets or people selling by the side of the roads. As much as I like to help the locals, their produce is often spoiled and more expensive than what you’d find in the supermarkets. You can find locally raised beef at one small shop that is next to the Marigot market. We bought some beef there one morning when we caught it still open, but I suspect that some people might be a bit leery of how “sanitary” the operation was. Well, all I can tell you is that even though the meat isn’t sold in the most hypersensitive conditions mandated by the US, Marigot is French and therefore inspected regularly by French enforcement, so they are in effect doing all that is necessary to keep the food supply safe.

For organics, try the Bio-Man health food store on the main street in Marigot. The guys in there are pretty helpful and nice. Prices are decent too.

We ate out a little bit while we were there. Here’s what we found. Definitely visit:

The Roti truck along the Salt Pond near Phillipsburg. You’ll know her because she has a big blackboard out front with the simple word “ROTI” written on it. She only has 4 types: curried goat, salt fish, chicken and vegetarian, but that’s all you really need. To wash it down, she has partnered with a “the coconut man” a guy who will serve you fresh coconut water in the coconut out front for only $3 each. Who needs soda? This is what every fast food joint should be about!

Grand Case has lots of high end Italian and French restaurants plus lolos, which are more modest local food stalls. We ate in one lolo one afternoon when look for something to tide us over until dinner. It was quite good and cheap. Grand Case is well-known for its one-to-one exchange rate of the US Dollar for the Euro. So make sure you only pay with dollars since the dollar is pretty worthless compared to the Euro these days!

Le Piment in Baie Orientale was a very good restaurant where we enjoyed our first meal after arriving. I had a spectacular foie gras salad and the service was great that time. We went back a week later for dessert only and the waitress complained that she shouldn’t have seated us had she known as she “had reservations”. That kinda tainted the experience since dessert was almost as expensive as a meal and there were more tables free 20 minutes later when we were done, so who knows why she chose to be a douche at that time….

Little Italy (?) I think is the name of the Italian restaurant two doors down from Le Piment on the other side of the Happy Days restaurant. We had a decent meal there, but to tell you the truth, I can’t even remember what I ate. It was OK as I recall though. I’m sure I would have remembered it better if it were awful.

Mai is a beautiful Vietnamese woman who owns this authentic Vietnamese restaurant. Her restaurant is located on the street parallel to the main street along the waterfront. From the waterfront, find the famous Sarafina’s boulangerie (bakery) and walk up the tiny side street next to it. On the next block, hang a right and less than a block away, you’ll find Mai’s restaurant. Mai and her daughter will welcome you with open arms into this quiet little sanctuary away from the hustle and bustle of the somewhat chaotic city.

Sarafina’s is hands down considered the best bakery on the island. They have very well made authentic French bread including pain au levain naturel (sourdough) and pain aux lardons (bread with tiny bits of bacon in it). We got the latter along with a few fruit tarts for our flight back home — anything to avoid plane food, but oh, so delicious it was as the other passengers looked on in envy! The other bakery two doors down (I forget the name, but it has sucre in the title) wasn’t  bad either. And the bakery on the main road in Grand Case next to the fabulous Busco, purveyor of fine Caribbean flavors, was very nice as well.

Top Carrot, not to be confused with Carrot Top, was pretty good for their mixed mezze plate. Basically a vegetarian menu with all the trappings that come along with that such as veggie oils and soy-based crap, but you can get decent food. Of course, it’s the kind of meal that leaves real food eaters wanting for more. Apparently, it does with the regulars as well as quite a number of regulars where lighting up cigarettes over their “healthy” meals.

At all costs, avoid the:

Boo Boo Jam – This was unfortunately the beach restaurant to which our apartment had privileges. With our stay, we had full access to using their transats (lounge chairs) and umbrellas plus a 10% discount on food. Well, the lounge chairs and umbrellas looked to be in tip-top shape (although we never got to use them due to time constraints that day) and the drinks were fine, but the food was absolutely abysmal!!!! Just look at the size of this gross hamburger they served my daughter. One bite and she couldn’t even choke down the rest. My husband and I split the local plate — a concoction of various seafood items. Absolutely disgusting! It was mashed whatever with a sour (but not lemon) bite to it alongside some fried then apparently frozen and microwaved shrimp. They had the nerve to charge 20 bucks for it too!

According to our hosts, they and their partners had bought into the establishment and then they realized that the staff there is grandfathered in and have no desire to change. Because of French law, there is no way to get rid of them apparently. So they basically have to wait until the people die, quit or are just put out of business which is likely because they are losing money every day.

Where have you eaten in Saint Martin? Anything else you can add to the conversation?


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Surprising facts about St. Martin

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Because people had always touted the beauty of St. Martin, I always thought it would be a lush island with lots of natural resources. Instead, we found out that the island has virtually no natural water source. Without a natural source of water, there is no local food. Sure you might find the odd cow, goat or chicken as well as some coconut palms, but there were basically no farms on the island. Everything is imported.

The French side imports everything from France, the US and the other French Caribbean islands like Guadeloupe and Martinique. The French side is actually considered part of Europe meaning that it abides by all French laws including those of sanitation. So you might want to bear this in mind if you have serious concerns about hygiene when shopping in certain markets.

The Dutch side is not actually part of the Netherlands, but still seems to rely on the mother land for certain benefits under the crown. It seems that they are seeking to become part of some sort of Caribbean Union, but haven’t decided if they are ready to go it alone yet or not. From the food standpoint, they also must import everything, but it seems most goods come from the US, the Netherlands and some the Dutch Antilles.

While I knew that people loved the island for buying cheap booze, I had no idea that cigarettes and hard drugs were really cheap and easy to get as well. In fact, it seems that people, especially kids in their late teens and twenties who come there to work, routinely get hooked on drugs because it’s actually cheaper than food! The local police say that there are so many speedboats that come in each night with them that they can’t keep up.

Pretty depressing to think about all these kids getting hooked on drugs to the point that they get fired because they can’t do their jobs anymore. Most shake out of it, but many do not and their lives are ruined.  And so it goes on. I guess there is no paradise where one can escape social ills after all.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Thanksgiving and the End to Hospitality

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Let’s face it, hospitality is dead. It seems like you can’t go anywhere these days without somebody complaining about how whatever it is that you were eating or you’re serving in your holiday meal conflicts with their social or moral stance on something.

Back in the day, when somebody went to another person’s house and they didn’t like something on the table, they would just suck it up and eat it or politely say “I’m not that hungry” and be done with it. Instead today we have a plethora of people with all kinds of objections from vegetarian and vegan to dairy haters and raw foodists who say that they refused to eat anything that’s off of the diet. Ironically, most of these people also claim to be fans of the moderation theory, but where’s the moderation in shunning an entire food group because of some personal beef against it?

Interestingly enough, moderation is the defense only when it comes to candy. Recently, actress Natalie Portman while she was pregnant decided that sbeing vegan wasn’t right for her, but that she needed to eat pastries with eggs and dairy in order to sustain on the health of her baby. How ludicrous is that?! Granted, the protein sources would be beneficial to the baby, but the sugar certainly would not be.

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Anyway, back to the holidays. So what happens is now when we have the holidays, such as Thanksgiving or Christmas, we can’t just have our food the way we like it served on the table. We can’t keep the traditions of our families  and our ancestors on the table. No, we have to go out of our way to create tasteless soy-based vegan approved main courses and desserts like Tofurkey and chocolate pudding made from avocados. This is unfortunate.

Equally as backwards is that if someone shows up to such a function with food allergies, a serious health condition no matter which variation that person has (sensitivities, allergies or intolerances) his or her family and friends, the people who supposedly care about them, try to prod that person into eating something that could irreparably harm his or her body. The only exception to this usually is with true allergies that could result in death. Allergies of all types must be heeded at least until the body is repaired, but so few people take them seriously enough to actually be choosy with what they eat. Meanwhile, those who make conscious decisions to be a pain in the ass, get all the respect and attention.

With the age of political correctness, people are losing their cultures. We no longer enjoy one another’s company because we’re all on some righteous mission to save something other than ourselves. It’s sad but it’s true.

Don’t get me wrong. I definitely have the way I like to eat, a way that has been proven since the dawn of time to maintain and/or improve human health. That doesn’t mean, however, that I can’t put it aside for one meal to enjoy the company of friends and family.

So this year during the holidays, try to think of the greater good instead of what makes your ego feel special. If you know deep down that you are special, then there is no need to demonstrate it through being difficult and demanding during the holidays.


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

A Mouse Ate My Soap!

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It is often said that you shouldn’t eat something that animals won’t eat. Soybeans immediately come to mind in this category as animals instinctively won’t eat it unless it is ground up into food that they normally would eat. Many processed foods also fit this category. People often notice that if they have processed food like cold cereal (think Cheerios, Cocoa Puffs and the like) alongside say crackers in their cabinets, the crackers will be eaten, but the extruded cereal will remain untouched.

So as it goes, one of my homesteading projects is making soap. It was something I became interested in about 20 years ago, but never really got the opportunity to start doing it until I moved into my own house about 10 years ago.

Anyway, the type of soap I make isn’t the melt n’ pour glycerin type, but the hard core, old fashioned pioneer stuff. I generally start with a lard or tallow (beef fat) base, sometimes mixed with palm or coconut oil, water and lye (a caustic chemical derived from wood ashes). That is the basic soap recipe. Then I add some essential oils and different food items lying around such as cornmeal (for a good scrubbing soap), oatmeal (for a soothing soap), rum and spices (for a manly soap) etc.

I was keeping some of my cured soap (soap that is at least one month old) in plastic boxes with no lid in my closet. This is usually not recommended as the scents can become dulled over time as they are exposed to air. What I didn’t expect, however, is that it attracted a mouse!

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My husband went to grab a bar of soap the other night and holy crap! There was mouse poop in the box (a lot of it!) and tooth marks in all the soap. And I’m not talking just some tiny hints of tooth marks. These mice went to town!

As ticked off as I was that I needed to throw out my soap, I was quite flattered to see that my soap is considered food by animals even though it went through the processing in lye. Some soap marketers will try to scare you away from homemade soap saying it is too alkaline for the skin. Some nutrition buffs will try to scare you from it because “if you can’t eat it, why would you put it on your skin?”

Well, I do lard and tallow even if I don’t eat lye. And I don’t use canola oil or soy which don’t give the best results for soap anyway and I don’t eat them because they are slow-acting poisons, not food. In my view, humans have been making soap from lye and animal fat for centuries. And if they weren’t clipped by some sanitation-related disease, then these same individuals often lived to 90 or 100. They weren’t poisoned by their soap. And based on my experience with the mouse, I’d say that my soap is indeed food! (Although I don’t anticipate eating it any time soon!)


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

The Real Costa Rica?

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OK. So we returned from our Costa Rica trip five weeks ago and, FINALLY, I’ve found some time to share both the disappointments and gems we encountered down there.

Costa Rica is a beautiful country hailed for its eco-friendly attributes — lush rain forests, mountains, and pristine beaches. But it is equally ridiculed for its boring, even awful, food. In both cases, we encountered major disillusionment, but luckily that led to discovering lots of friendly people and off the beaten track experiences.

The first disappointment was that while Costa Rica certainly had beautiful rain forests, dramatic mountains an gorgeous beaches (particularly the one where we stayed), it was far from environmentally conscious in so many ways. First of all, darn near everything is packaged in plastic. I understand that Costa Rica is a poor country. So fine, there is no opportunity to recycle all that plastic, but burning it by the side of the road? Well, that was the view driving along the highway every night after sundown — men standing over burning garbage (plastic and all) pushing it around with a stick. It smelled awful! And I don’t even want to think about the estrogens and other endocrine disruptors that were in the fumes these poor people were inhaling.

Now, maybe it’s just me, but I didn’t expect the country that kicked Starbucks out and is at least sort of embracing sustainable energy to be completely overrun with European hotels, ugly condos and Wal-Mart! Some of this expansion seems to be relatively new in the Jaco area, but nonetheless, it was a shame. While these places seemed to provide some jobs, in many (if not, most) cases, the development left many natives homeless. To boot, prices were totally jacked up! I’m from New York City and would never pay their inflated prices there, which made it a little difficult to get totally comfortable with paying their often ridiculous prices for simple services. But as much as possible, we tried to at least patronize the mom and pop establishments which often still were “overcharging”. Seeing as they were living in such an expensive area, it was easier to know that they would get 100% of profits instead of seeing it shipped back to the US or Europe.

We were also shocked to learn that it was really difficult to find native handcrafts — at least where we were. In fact, the Canadian woman who stayed in the apartment upstairs from us has been visiting Costa Rica every year for seven years and learned from friends who own a souvenir shop down there that most of the so-called Costa Rican handcrafts come from Thailand! Yes. And the Thai artisans who manufacture these goods are so in tune the Costa Rican fauna that they’ve sent wood carvings of bears with salmon down there bearing a “made in Costa Rica” sticker. So we never ran into the limited edition bear with salmon carving, but this piece of information explained why I thought the wooden products looked distinctly Asian.

This lack of reasonably priced and authentic Costa Rican souvenirs made gift shopping really difficult. It was further complicated by the fact that there was a virtual absence of nice food or toiletry items in any of the stores. That brings me to Costa Rican food, which I’ll continue with later.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.