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Healthy

Reclaiming the Definition of Health; Guest Sally Fallon Morell Discusses the Pioneering Work of Weston A Price

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Sally Fallon Morell on the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Hernia, cirrhosis of the liver, hepatitis C, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer.... believe it or not, today you can have all of these disorders and more and still be considered healthy by the modern medical establishment!

This week, we go deeper into the definition of health by looking at how traditional peoples eating their native diets exhibit physical and mental signs of good health. Special guest, Sally Fallon Morell, talks to us about her masterpiece Nourishing Traditions and what the work of Dr. Weston A. Price reveals about the power of our most vilified foods -- saturated fat and cholesterol -- and how these foods may be able to lower doctor bills and increase longevity.

To delve deeper into the world of Sally Fallon, have a read through her books:

Thanks for listening! Please share this episode to help spread the word. You can also subscribe to get updates about new episodes and get a copy of The Nutrition Heretic's S#IT List: 7 Health Food To Avoid Like The Plague in your inbox by clicking here.

New Year's Resolution for Healthier Kids

New Year's Resolution for Healthier Kids

So many parents are looking for easier ways to feed their kids. Time, budget and convenience are HUGE excuses used for feeding their children snacks and quasi-meals loaded with artificial ingredients, sugars (yes, even juices) and other items missing vital nutrients. My friend, Valérie Delahaye...

Day 10 - Raging Stool

The environment within our bodies is the most important one for warding off disease. Yet we are rarely encouraged to nurture it. This video will explain the biggest threat to your immune system, as well as a major cause of both diabetes and cancer. See how the Reset Your Body Health Challenge will help correct the problem. The power is always within your hands to heal your body with this protocol.

The other day, a member of the challenge was inquiring about my recipe for the spinach omelet I ate last week. To tell the truth, I’ve been making it for over 20 years and have to kind of eyeball the method every time I make it depending on quality of the spinach, and size of the eggs. Sometimes I use fresh spinach, when I get enough from our co-op, but otherwise, I will use frozen as spinach can be a pain to clean and fresh in the supermarket is often tasteless. In any case, here’s the recipe for:

Spanish-style Spinach Omelet

1 10 oz. package of frozen, chopped spinach, thawed

3 Tbs extra virgin olive oil or 2 Tbs. lard (lard makes a naturally non-stick surface)

1 clove garlic, chopped fine

8 large eggs

sea salt to taste

Heat a medium-sized cast iron or ceramic non-stick frying pan, then add oil or lard until melted. Add garlic and sauté for 30 seconds before adding spinach. Cook spinach until all excess water has evaporated. Meanwhile in a bowl, beat eggs and salt together. When the spinach is dry enough, lift it out of the pan and add to the bowl with the eggs. If frying pan seems too dry, add a bit more olive oil or lard to coat. When hot, but not smoking, add egg and spinach mixture to the pan. As the bottom layer cooks, gently create pockets in the egg so that the uncooked egg can move to the bottom. When omelet is fairly solid, place a plate (at least the same size as the frying pan) over the top and invert the frying pan. Then gently slide the omelet back into the frying pan (add more oil or lard if necessary) to cook the other side. Alternately, if the handle of your frying pan can handle it, place the frying pan into the broiler (grill) for 5 minutes or so to cook the top of the omelet.

This omelet can easily be made with cauliflower as well. Simply use 10 oz of frozen cauliflower, cook and chop fine before adding to the eggs.


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 5 - Making Progress

Only day 5 into the Challenge and already, I’m experiencing phenomenal changes in some health problems I’ve been experiencing since getting Dengue Fever in 2009 and an accident early in 2012. All the chiropractic and acupuncture was pretty ineffective without making these changes in my eating. Find out what kinds of benefits you can expect on the Reset Your Body Health Challenge.

So what did I eat today? Cauliflower omelet for breakfast, almond crackers, and meatloaf with sautéed cabbage for dinner. I used my own homemade ketchup for the dressing made from tomato paste. I also introduced carrots which were in the meatloaf and used dried leeks in place of breadcrumbs to keep it moist.

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Gotta run. Baby wants to exercise.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 4 - Handling Your Off Days

Today we had a family event to attend. I didn’t prepare as well as I could have, but I survived without betraying all the work I’ve done so far in the Challenge. Here are some tips you may not have heard about eating out and sticking to any diet or health challenge.

So what did I eat at the restaurant? Steamed fish and lobster, a slice of steak, string beans, seaweed salad and a scallop. Pretty basic, not many seasonings on the food. I was very satisfied at the end of the meal. So now it’s time to get back on the wagon.

Back tomorrow with more!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

The Exercise and Weight Loss Myth

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Everybody has heard the mantra that if you need or want to lose weight then you’ve got to cut calories while increasing exercise. Well, you all know how bogus I think the whole calorie counting crap is because not all calories are created equally. But the push for more exercise is also full of sh!t. There is no doubt that moving our bodies is important and being a couch potato isn’t the best thing in the world, but the blanket recommendation for everybody to increase their heart rate every day and run or bike across country to lose weight is ignorant at best and staggeringly dangerous at worst.

For years, I had noted the correlation between exercise and autism as well as infertility amongst clients, friends and acquaintances, but it wasn’t until I began to dig deeper into my own challenge with a whopping 20 lb weight gain during the two weeks following a traumatic car accident that I realized how horrible exercise can  be on the human body. Before you jump down my throat and say that I must have been eating a ton of fat, cake or whatever, that’s not the case. During the two weeks following the accident I had virtually no appetite. In fact the few times that I ate, I only ate some cucumbers and drank water. That’s it. And if you think that I’m a lazy person who hates exercise, you’re partially right. I’ve never been one for exercise just for the sake of exercise. Yet, at the time of the accident, I was a belly and hula dancer. So I was getting plenty of exercise up until the day of the accident.

Unfortunately the accident sent my body into a tailspin. And during the two weeks immediately following I had absolutely no energy to do anything. However that still should not have equated to a 20 pound weight gain. Especially since the only thing that I was eating were cucumbers and the only thing that I was drinking was water.

Over the coming weeks, my body got weaker and weaker. I slipped into depression and felt horrible. I tried to exercise, but would feel completely exhausted every time I did. I tried things that to me were counterintuitive, but in an attempt to try anything, I ate a diet of only fruits and vegetables for three weeks to see if I would gain any positive results. It wasn’t until the very end of the three weeks that a few of the pounds started to come off. However as the weight began to come off, my body began to feel weaker and weaker. All I could do was sleep all day getting up for a few hours of the day to nibble on something and go straight back to bed.

The worst part was when I realized that exercise only made the condition worse. One weekend I attended a bellydancing workshop and within two days of eating a little more than tuna fish and drinking a few glasses of water, I had gained a whopping 6 pounds! And no, it wasn’t muscle! I also attended a Chinese dietetics class over the course of that year. The class took place in New York City which was over an hour from where I live. The class took place one weekend per month for 10 months. During the weekends when I had class, I did very little eating and drinking and lots and lots of walking to and from the train,  during my lunch break, and at the end of the day when I would stay my friend’s house which entailed a 20 minute walk from the subway station. Once a month I could expect to gain at least 5 pounds during the weekend when I attended my Chinese dietetics class. Again, it wasn’t muscle, but water and bloating. If exercise and this kind of effect on my body, then I wanted no part of it.

It wasn’t until several years later at a nutrition conference that I learned not only was my condition very common, but that leading doctors, nutritionists and healers were all recommending the same method of healing this condition. Rest! As it turns out, when the body is under stress, particularly from trauma such as a car accident, it becomes inflamed. And any kind of exercise, even something as simple as walking, can cause the body to pack on the pounds even in the absence of food. This type of trauma can also come from things like the death of a loved one, not having enough access to sunlight or fresh food, living in an abusive household, and many other things that you probably would not have considered. But this revelation was not only a solution to my problem, it brought to light the problem that many of my exercise, fitness and dance friends were suffering from — pushed past a certain point, the body (in many people) will interpret exercise as punishment!

The adrenal glands, which sit on top of the kidneys, are responsible for managing stress. When they are not happy, they signal the kidneys to hold on to water and minerals in an attempt to protect the body. Even though we are often said the concept that exercise brings joy, to some people in certain conditions it is clear that exercise becomes a major stressor, triggering the adrenals to sense fear.

To correct this condition, it is necessary to supply the adrenals with their primary foods such as those which are high in vitamin C and natural salt, such as Celtic sea salt. In addition, it is necessary to allow them to relax. That includes getting lots of additional sleep. Going to bed before 11 o’clock at night and waking up after 9 AM is ideal. In addition, you would also want to make sure to get a nap in the afternoon, preferably in the sunshine so that your body is supplied with plenty of vitamin D, which is calming to the body. So break out the lounge chair!

Another thing to keep in mind is that drinking plain water can be very stressful to the body in this condition. The adrenal glands will be overstressed with trying to process too much water. So make sure to keep consumption on the low side and to primarily get your water from fresh foods during the recovery period.

So if you, like me, have had to endure the misery of gaining weight more fat than muscle by exercising, don’t let the fitness gurus beat you up and make you feel shameful about your condition! They are simply regurgitating a mantra that everyone has had rammed down their throats for the past 40 years. A mantra that describes an activity that only seems to be beneficial for about 1/3 of the population. In all likelihood, if you are in a state of adrenal fatigue or exhaustion, you do NOT need to exercise more. If anything, you need to exercise less. Much less. If you’ve had a sudden shock, you may need weeks or months to recover by allowing the adrenals to rest lots of times per day.

Take some time to get to know your body. What things feel comfortable? What makes you exhausted? And what makes you feel rejuvenated? Are you exercising 10 hours per week, but pudgier than people who only exercise 2 hours per week or less? No matter what it is, whenever you’re not getting the results you want, try going in the other direction. Just because everybody, even the experts, is saying there is one tried and true method to receive a particular outcome, that doesn’t mean that that method will work for you. Have you had a situation where exercise made your health worse or made you gain weight? I’d love to hear from you and all about your experiences. Please leave a comment below!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Jamaica: Land of Mosquitoes, Machetes and MSG, Part 1

This is kinda graphic. So don’t read if you don’t want to know that much about me!

Recently, a reader asked how she can stay healthy while visiting Jamaica. My family is Jamaican, but due to years of civil war, I never had any interest in returning. Then a few years back, my long lost cousin down there needed some cash to partake in a program which would allow her to come to the US and work for the summer. In exchange, her mom offered to give us a place to stay should we come down for a visit.

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Having gone more than 30 years without returning to JA, I decided that the time had come. Especially because I would have been staying with family instead of in a resort, which is really not my style at all.

Anyway, a few days after getting down there, I made my first dietary mistake. We went into town and stopped to get a beef patty. Now, I wasn’t expecting it to be a traditional patty, made with a good suet crust, as the place we bought it is was a chain called “Juicy”. All chain restaurants today use synthetic fats like Crisco and the like. Nonetheless, I was interested in seeing if the flavor in any way resembled what I had grown up with in the Bronx and what I can reproduce in my own kitchen.

Minutes after eating the patty, I was overcome with an intense thirst. MSG! I kept drinking and drinking, but nothing could satisfy my thirst. By the time I had gotten home, my ankles were swollen like tree stumps and my lymph nodes under my chin began to swell and hurt so much that I could barely turn my head. As the day went on, I noticed that I was barely urinating. This continued for days! Little did I know that several meals I had eaten over the following days contained a packet of soup stock that apparently EVERY Jamaican uses. It’s called Cock Soup and it is loaded with MSG.

About a week after our initial arrival, we left my cousin’s house to visit another part of the island — Portland. This is where the accumulation of MSG got nasty. On the way there (a 5 hour drive from my cousin’s house in Santa Cruz), I developed a cough, finding myself continuously coughing up some of the nastiest phlegm ever. Then that night after arriving at our apartment, I began running a fever, followed by intense diarrhea. It seems my body couldn’t figure out how to get rid of the build up of MSG except to make me sicker than I had ever been in my life (barring when I had an intestinal blockage in my 20s).

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As a result of this episode, I spent the next 2 days confined to my bed unable to do anything but sleep. The first day, I ate a little of the food that the Rastaman-caretaker prepared for me (and it was damn good!), but was afraid to eat anything that I didn’t prepare myself. So I ended up eating mostly fruit and drinking coconut water, which only made me severely hypoglycemic in the absence of any savory foods. It wasn’t until I headed to Kingston where we stayed in the Kingston Retreat that had a stove that I was finally able to make myself some chicken soup and other nourishing dishes with my own sea salt that I had brought with me from the U.S. Even so, it took me 4 weeks after my return to the U.S. before I actually felt well again.

Looking back, I guess I could have talked more extensively with some Rasta dudes to find out what exactly they used in their cooking. They’re food is supposed to be ital, which basically means that it is supposed to be pure, using only naturally derived ingredients. Even though, it’s mainly a vegetarian diet with the exception of some fish, they are supposed to use things like coconut oil, which other Jamaicans have all but forgotten.

In Jamaica, everybody believes that their food is natural, even those who are using Cock Soup and rancid vegetable oils in all of their recipes. And as much as I hate to say it, the island mentality doesn’t exactly lend itself to getting real answers to questions like “What do you use in that?” I was too exhausted to really get into any conversation that was unlikely to get me any real answers.

So how do you stay healthy on a Jamaican vacation?

1. Bring a packet of sea salt — especially if you are MSG sensitive like me. You will probably need to cook most of your food.

2. Seek out Rastas, if you’re eating out. Talk to them about what EXACTLY they are cooking with. Just hope they’re not too high to understand what you’re saying.

3. Go to outdoor markets to buy food you plan to cook. Big supermarkets and butcher shops should be good for animal based foods. But most chickens are fed “feed”, so just be aware. At least they do get to run about.

4. Don’t eat the patties. Interestingly enough, I have lots of recipes for patties in cookbooks that have been printed outside of Jamaica and not one of them contains MSG. ALL of the cookbooks in Jamaica tell you to add MSG or a Chinese version of it called ve-ting (or something like that).

5. Foods like rice and peas or jerk pork/chicken should be devoid of MSG and should be OK. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a jerk recipe in Jamaica that had MSG in it.

6. You probably want to avoid Chinese restaurants.

7. Upscale places may be OK and the people who work there are used to dealing with tourists, so you may get a straightforward answer to questions about what’s in the meal.

I’ll be back to talk about the other two M’s of Jamaica soon.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Foie Gras: The Truth behind the Delicacy

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One food that I was excited (yes, I said excited) to see in St. Martin was foie grasFoie gras has gotten a lot of bad press over the years because several special interest groups have decided to target this tiny cottage industry over a lack of understanding the anatomy and feeding habits of geese in the wild as well as the desire to feel powerful and self-righteous in shutting down a few mom and pop operations while battery farms and experiments on children run rampant. It’s a matter of focusing on what one feels is right or wrong, which always leads to pain and suffering for the one casting stones.  It’s a shame.

The reason why people say they are so opposed to the practice of eating or raising foie gras is because it involves a process called gavage or force-feeding a goose or duck to fatten its liver. What is not understood is that these animals “force feed” themselves in nature! In fact, anyone who has seen the gavage performed will notice that the geese clamor around the farmer, knocking one another over, to get to the good stuff! The lies about geese being nailed to the ground are the fabrication of people who have never been anywhere near a real foie gras  farm.

Another concern is that the animal is choking during the process. Remember, we are talking about geese here, not humans, cats, dogs or any other mammal. Geese do not breathe and eat from the same opening. The tube leading to the stomach is much larger than and next to the pulmonary opening.

I have visited many of these farms in Quebec and I can tell you that geese raised for foie gras are the healthiest, cleanest and most respected farm animals I have ever seen. They have tons of space to roam on grass and get plenty of sun — unlike their factory, organic or cage-free chicken cousins. When the gavage happens, it is very quick and happens in the blink of an eye (literally), so there is no lengthy process involved.

And what about the health repercussions? I have never seen an obese foie gras producer. I’m not saying they don’t exist, but they seem to live to an old age, without the signs of advanced aging I notice in the average yogini, and they tend to be very lean. Makes ya think.

The final point I’d like to raise is that there are approximately only 100,000 geese and ducks raised for foie gras every year. Meanwhile, there are over 9 BILLION chickens raised in horrifying conditions such as being boxed in tiny crates, engineered so their legs would break if they walk, de-clawing, de-beaking etc. Yet, many people who are trying to get legislation passed to shut down these small farms would gladly go to the local diner, restaurant or even places like Whole Foods and purchase conventionally raised or so-called cage-free chicken and eggs and not think twice about their decision. (Cage free only means that the animal is still locked in a filthy barn, but just not in a cage) So before we point fingers at one another and try to claim dietary superiority to one another, we must know all of the background and make rational decisions that do not involve our egos.

So even though French people in France are starting to give into irrational, misguided pressure from fanatical groups, it was a real pleasure to see people on St. Martin buying all forms of duck and goose — including foie gras. I just hope they don’t lose their culture and tradition as so many have in the name of self-righteousness.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Health Food in St. Martin

Health Food in St. Martin

Health Food in St. Martin

If you can’t eat just anywhere, then here’s your guide to finding health foods on vacation. In particular, people with severe intolerances like gluten intolerance will need to pack their food.

As you know, I like to pack my own healthy stuff to bring on my trips. Usually, a few cans of mercury-free tuna and/or salmon, some fig or coconut bars, plantain chips fried in heat stable palm oil and sometimes even sea salt if I have no idea what I’ll find on the other side.

Luckily, St. Martin also has some decent options for people who are suffering from allergies of all sorts. The first place you should consider is the Bio-Man in Marigot. It’s near the waterfront, but on the south side away from where the crux of the action is. One nice thing about Bio-Man is that they have food for omnivores and don’t consider stuff healthy just because it’s veggie based. So you can find some decent meats, eggs and even raw butter there as well as full fat plain yogurt.

The two supermarkets you want to check out are the Grand Marché just south of Marigot (and presumably the ones nearer the airport would have a good selection as well) and the US Market in Grand Case, which is a bit more expensive. At the very least, you will find French meats, which are practically organic and pastured by US standards as well as sea salt and organic olive oil and vinegars. I wouldn’t go to anything in Philippsburg for health foods. Those places tend to be dirty and junky and cater to a different crowd altogether.

Throughout the island you will find a bunch of rasta eateries that serve fresh juices and vegetarian fare as well as a restaurant and bookstore called Top Carrot in the Philippsburg area. Top Carrot claims to have homemade ice cream, but we didn’t notice when we went in there.

If you know anything about me, you’ll know that I tend to steer clear of these places because they focus so much on the vegetarian aspect of things that their food is typically littered with all kinds of rancid vegetable oils and synthetic soy/almond/hemp animal replacement ingredients that are major contributors to disease. Ironically, the very thing that helps to abate the negative effects of these types of food (because the body’s cells have an innate preference for them) is ANIMAL FOODS! No wonder so many vegetarians end up with bloated bellies and falling hair!

Nonetheless, you can certainly find any food you want or NEED to eat while vacationing on St. Martin!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Bacon Lovers Rejoice!

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Recently, I saw a reporter ask the question, “Can you eat bacon and still be healthy?” If you’ve read anything I’ve been writing over the past 3 years, you’ll realize that my answer is a resounding YES! As a certified nutritionist who believes in following the wisdom of the ancients and traditional eating when it comes to eating food, I whole-heartedly believe in the virtues of eating bacon and all pork products.  Why? Because it works! The American establishment of processed foods has rewritten history books and health to suit their own pursuits. Let me explain.

We are told to eat a Mediterranean diet to be healthy, right? Well guess what they eat in the Mediterranean? Pork! Go to any traditional Italian home and you will find plenty of pork on the menu. In fact, northern Italy celebrates a lardo festival every fall where producers or lardo — the fattiest and tastiest bacon around — show up to share what they have been making all year.

The French? Oh yes, they eat loads of pork fat, dairy and other foods that we here in the states are taught to fear. Do you really think it’s a glass of wine that’s bringing it all together? No! It’s the entire diet. Including the bacon/pork fat. In fact, when I lived in France some 20 years ago before they heard that pork was supposed to be bad for you, I remember my elderly neighbor coming over to the house one day telling me and my roommates about how healthy and LIGHT pork fat was. In my arrogant American 18 year old mind, I looked at her like she was insane. Pork? Light? Well, it turns out when you don’t wrap it in a bleached white flour bun of sorts, it’s really light. It’s also the perfect non-stick surface. Do you realize how much teflon (which is a neurotoxin) has been sold to avoid nature’s perfect non-stick solution???? Pork fat also doesn’t absorb very readily into fried foods. Try frying a batch of chicken in it. Then do the same with vegetable oil (another poison) and you’ll see that you constantly need to replenish vegetable oil, whereas a good dollop of lard will last for the entire batch!

I was just in Berlin where everybody eats a diet of pork breaded and fried in lard! And you know what? People are way slimmer there than they are here. But on the whole they are also thinner than people in Spain, Southern France and Italy — where I’ve also recently been. They also don’t seem to age as poorly.

The Japanese. Again, pork fat. In fact, a Japanese family that used to live near me in Princeton kept asking me where they could get nice fresh lard like I source from my farmers in Pennsylvania. Sure they eat fish and miso, but pork fat is equally prominent (at least until they read American politically correct books that shame them into rewriting their own culinary history).

In Chinese medicine, pork is revered as the perfect balancing food. Right in between yin and yang. Bacon is a much revered delicacy that is used in many Schezuan dishes and even in a wedding dessert! Bacon and pork fat are used to ease constipation — not fiber  (but this is another story. Let’s just say, doesn’t it make sense to promote a bowel movement by easing it out than pushing it out by force????).

I could go on and on from my own personal experiences with pork and healing people’s bodies or reducing their weight, but that could be an entire book.

So not only is it possible to eat pork and be healthy. I’d say that pork is darn near necessary to maintain excellent health. Sometimes I laugh when so-called health enthusiasts make themselves literally sick and allergic to multiple foods by avoiding real foods like pork in favor of synthetic taste alikes which do nothing but damage their guts and put big money into the hands of food processing companies. In the meantime, I who used to be highly allergic and sick since early childhood, healed myself with pork (including loads of bacon) and other REAL FOODS. Let’s face it, if what you’re doing to be healthy isn’t making you healthy, you’ve got to try the opposite of what you believe in — even if it’s as off the wall as eating bacon.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.