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Kvass

Day 23 - What can I drink besides water?

If you’ve become accustomed to drinking soda, coffee, tea, wine or juice, you may be thinking that your drinking options are limited. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, there are several things you can drink that are compatible with this Challenge as well as extremely delicious. Here are just a few ideas off the top of my head.

One drink I didn’t mention is beet kvass — a drink of Eastern European origin. I drink it fairly frequently throughout the year. Most people tell me that they love it. I wouldn’t say that I necessarily love it, but I do crave it because my body needs it. Beets are excellent for building blood and with my history of anemia, it’s understandable why I crave it from time to time. The recipe I use comes from Sally Fallon and Mary Enig’s book, Nourishing Traditions — a book that EVERYBODY who is interested in good health should have on the shelf. To make a half gallon of beet kvass, you need:

3 medium sized beets

1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt

2 tablespoons of whey (drained from yogurt or milk kefir through a coffee filter) or water kefir

filtered water

Chop beets roughly — not too fine or you will make alcohol! Add other ingredients and water to fill your jar. Let sit at room temperature for 3 days (2 in warm weather). Chill. Give a quick stir before pouring off some of the water for the first time. I use a sprouting lid on the top of my mason jar to hold the beets in the jar as I pour off the kvass. I don’t discard the beets until I am down to my last 1/2 cup of kvass. I pour this off into a clean jar and use it in place of whey to start a new batch. The chopped beets end up in the compost pile


About Adrienne Hew

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Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.