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Recipe

Day 28 - You Can Have Grains, If You Eat Them Like This

Grains are getting a bad rap these days. While it is true that a staggering number of people are suddenly proving to be gluten intolerant, it is also true that this is largely a man made health problem only worsened by the practice of simply avoiding grains instead of working on resolving the underlying issue. Today’s video focuses on what you can do differently to consume grains and other foods in the best possible way to boost digestion and nutrient assimilation…. and perhaps most importantly, avoid allergies, intolerances and sensitivities.

As mentioned in the videos, raw meats are incredibly easy to digest and for many people seem to unlock a missing link in their digestive woes. Here is my recipe for gravlax, a raw salmon dish from Scandinavia. Enjoy it the way it is prepared in the video for a quick and satisfying meal.

GRAVLAX

2 lbs wild salmon fillets, preferably skinned and sliced in half

3 Tablespoons Celtic sea salt

2 Tablespoons rapadura sugar

1 bunch dill, fresh

cognac or aquavit to sprinkle (optional)

Make sure that salmon fillets are free of scales. Mix salt and sugar. Coat salmon in salt mixture. Sprinkle each side with a tiny amount of optional cognac or aquavit. Place dill over one slice of the fish, then place the other slice of fish on top. Wrap tightly in parchment paper or plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator for 48 hours, turning once. To serve, slice thinly. Serve with fresh lemon and butter on sourdough toast. This is an easy, quick meal any time of day.

(Note that in the picture, I didn’t have fresh dill, so I used dill I dried myself over the summer. Since there is no water content, I used considerably less by volume than I normally would have.)


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 27 - How Many Calories Should You Eat Every Day?

With obesity spreading across the planet like wildfire, there has been a shift from nourishment toward eating based on caloric intake. Indeed even many doctors today believe that calories are the primary concern with what we eat — not fat, protein, carbohydrates or even vitamins and minerals. There are so many things that food will or won’t do for us. But what are calories and how do we get them to work for us, not against us? You know the drill…

Chestnut Crepe Recipe

Check out this simple crepe recipe I made the other day. It’s just 2 cups chestnut flour, 2 eggs, 1 1/2 cups milk and 2 Tablespoons of melted butter whisked. Let sit for 20 minutes and then pour into a hot non-PFOA, non-stick skillet by the 1/2 cupful to make delicious crepes. The filling here is the same sauteed apples with cream we saw from the other day. Yum!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 24 - How to Be a Vegetarian on the Challenge

Vegetarians will often wonder how to comply with the Challenge and still remain true to their vegetarianism. Even though the ideal Challenge foods have already been discussed in the previous days, I’ve created this video to more fully explain how to get the proper protein and fat you need to keep your body’s energy humming and systems working optimally. Watch the video to learn more.

Tonight, we had a nice dessert treat. Sauteed apples with cream. Simply core and slice apples to desired thinness. Melt butter in a frying pan and add apples when warm. Grate a pinch of fresh nutmeg over. Stir and cook until apples are just a bit translucent (or as much as you want, really). Stir to coat apples. No added sugar, just a little vanilla extract in the raw whipped cream. Nutmeg brought out the natural sugar in the apples. Better than pie and done in about 15 minutes.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 10 - Raging Stool

The environment within our bodies is the most important one for warding off disease. Yet we are rarely encouraged to nurture it. This video will explain the biggest threat to your immune system, as well as a major cause of both diabetes and cancer. See how the Reset Your Body Health Challenge will help correct the problem. The power is always within your hands to heal your body with this protocol.

The other day, a member of the challenge was inquiring about my recipe for the spinach omelet I ate last week. To tell the truth, I’ve been making it for over 20 years and have to kind of eyeball the method every time I make it depending on quality of the spinach, and size of the eggs. Sometimes I use fresh spinach, when I get enough from our co-op, but otherwise, I will use frozen as spinach can be a pain to clean and fresh in the supermarket is often tasteless. In any case, here’s the recipe for:

Spanish-style Spinach Omelet

1 10 oz. package of frozen, chopped spinach, thawed

3 Tbs extra virgin olive oil or 2 Tbs. lard (lard makes a naturally non-stick surface)

1 clove garlic, chopped fine

8 large eggs

sea salt to taste

Heat a medium-sized cast iron or ceramic non-stick frying pan, then add oil or lard until melted. Add garlic and sauté for 30 seconds before adding spinach. Cook spinach until all excess water has evaporated. Meanwhile in a bowl, beat eggs and salt together. When the spinach is dry enough, lift it out of the pan and add to the bowl with the eggs. If frying pan seems too dry, add a bit more olive oil or lard to coat. When hot, but not smoking, add egg and spinach mixture to the pan. As the bottom layer cooks, gently create pockets in the egg so that the uncooked egg can move to the bottom. When omelet is fairly solid, place a plate (at least the same size as the frying pan) over the top and invert the frying pan. Then gently slide the omelet back into the frying pan (add more oil or lard if necessary) to cook the other side. Alternately, if the handle of your frying pan can handle it, place the frying pan into the broiler (grill) for 5 minutes or so to cook the top of the omelet.

This omelet can easily be made with cauliflower as well. Simply use 10 oz of frozen cauliflower, cook and chop fine before adding to the eggs.


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Day 2 - What Should You Eat To Be Healthy?

In this video, I discuss the foods you need to eat to get healthy. This throws many people for a loop especially if they’ve spent several years believing that they are “in the know” about all matters of health. But I have to ask you, if you’re so convinced that you know exactly what you should be eating, then why are you still searching for answers? Enjoy the video and please leave me a comment below.

Here’s what I ate for breakfast:

spinachquiche.jpg

And this is what I ate for dinner:

shrimpcauli.jpg

About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Christmas Dinner in St. Martin

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Yesterday was Christmas. We spent a lovely day without going anywhere. Well, it would’ve been a much more lovely day if the neighbor’s mom didn’t crash into our rental car. We’ll get it all sorted out in the morning, so I’ll have to let you know how it turns out then.

Anyway, this is the second Christmas that we have spent in the tropics and I hope this is the trend as I plan to move to Hawaii before next winter hits.

We spent the morning having a leisurely breakfast on the porch and then until about 2 pm by the pool. Unfortunately due to the high winds and rain of the past few days the water was really cold — no wonder nobody was swimming in there!

After taking a nap with the baby, I started on dinner — a seared duck breast cooked with a cider cream sauce and mushrooms served with mashed taro root. YUM!

Here’s how you make it:

Score the fat side of the duck breast taking care not to cut the meat. I like to do parallel lines in two directions so as to make diamond shapes in the fat. Season with sea salt and cracked black pepper to taste.

In a large frying pan, sear the duck breast fat side down for about 5-7 minutes until nearly all the fat has been rendered from the skin. Drain of the fat and SAVE IT!* Next, flip the breast over to the meat side and cook for a further 5-7 minutes. Remove to plate and keep warm with the fat side up to keep the meat from drying out. In the pan, add a tablespoon of butter and 8 ounces of quartered button mushrooms. Turn up heat and cook briefly on all sides. Remove to plate with duck on it. Then add the thinly sliced white part of one leek to the frying pan. Cook for one minute, then deglaze the pan with 1 cup of medium dry sparkling apple cider, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the frying pan. Allow sauce to reduce by half then add 1/2 cup heavy cream or crème fraîche to pan. Continue to reduce stirring occasionally until sauce coats the back of a spoon.

Return duck and mushrooms to pan. Coat them with sauce and adjust seasoning. Serve hot and enjoy!

*This will taste delicious in sauteed potatoes, stir fries, fried eggs or anywhere where people are normally told to use vegetable oil. There are a few distinct differences however. First, like lard, duck fat creates a natural non-stick surface in your pan. Second, it is light just like lard so it help you burn fat and will nourish your cells. In fact, poultry fat is a powerful immune system booster! Third, just like lard (again) it does not absorb into foods easily so you will use considerably less of it than you would of any vegetable oils. So if you insist on calorie counting, then use animal fats in cooking, not rancid vegetable oils!


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.

Travel souvenirs: What are the best souvenirs to bring back?

Travel-souvenirs.jpg

Traveling around different parts of the world, it’s always a challenge to find things that are new. In this age of globalization, it is easy to find the same boring stuff in practically every corner of the world. Of course I mainly only traveled to first world countries, or at least countries in the same hemisphere as me, but I still find that there are very few unique products that I can bring back to the United States.

So on all of our trips, we make it a point to go to health food stores or other specialty stores that don’t exist where we come from. One of the best things you can bring back from a trip is sea salt. Salt is the original local food.  We have a small collection of sea salt from all over the world:   Italy, Hawaii, Sicily, Spain, France, Germany, and so many other places. Each salt has its own character. The textures, subtle sweetness or lack thereof, are quite fascinating and are a nice touch to any meal you make when you return home.

Another thing I love to get when it bring back to the United States, so that I can enjoy them in the comfort of my own home is honey. Honey has got to be the other original local food. We have eaten local honeys from Spain, Jamaica, Hawaii, Costa Rica, Switzerland, Italy and France and just finished up a jar from Germany. It’s really fantastic to taste all the different flavors depending on what the bees are feeding on thyme flowers, coffee flowers or something else. The flavors are completely different and complex. Some surprisingly not as sweet as others and others so sweet it’s almost like a punch in the face.

One great food we like to bring back from our travels is coffee. I know, I know everybody says you shouldn’t be drinking coffee. However, even some of the strictest health gurus today are admitting that they enjoy a good cup of coffee every now and again. Remember when we talk about moderation we talk about real foods. And coffee in my opinion is one of those real food. Surprisingly, the coffee that I found the best in all of my travels over the last 10 years, is supposedly not the Kona coffee from Hawaii, nor is it the blue Mountain coffee from Jamaica. It certainly wasn’t the Costa Rican coffee that I had down there a few years ago. It wasn’t even the French coffee or the Italian espresso or cappuccino (which is the past was one of my favorite treats), but it was the coffee in Germany all places.  Germany had the absolute best tasting coffee I have had probably in my life. What was so great about it? It didn’t have a really acidic flavor and it didn’t even leave an aftertaste in my mouth. So we ended up bringing back about 4 pounds of it just enjoying at home. We drink a little (mine with lots of milk) on the weekends. A nice memory of a relaxing vacation in the exciting city of Berlin.

One last food that we like to bring back, but have to be careful with is cheese. You can only bring hard cheeses back into the United States. For the most part, in Europe at least you can still purchase wonderful raw milk cheeses which are packed with digestible nutrients lost in pasteurized versions. You are allowed to bring these back to the States technically, but with ridiculous raw milk regulations constantly becoming stricter and stricter in the US (so much for a free  country), it is more and more difficult to bring this back.

So sometimes if there is really good hard cheese from a place like Switzerland, I’ll buy a few pounds the day before I leave, have it vacuum sealed and put it in my suitcase. This is an amazing treat because the quality far surpasses most cheeses available in the  United States.

The final and most important thing that I like to bring back for myself is a cookbook — sometimes translated to English, sometimes not. Whatever I do, I make sure the cookbook focuses on traditional ingredients — the ones that have kept people healthy for centuries, not the politically correct versions that ruin every dish by using cheap vegetable oils or perhaps worse, giving low-fat advice. These books reveal the real ways that people eat, not the sanitized version pushed by overpaid scientists who lose their funding if they don’t push low quality industrialized products on people.

For my friends, I often will buy them one of the above gifts — if I have room. If not, a new thing I have found to be a great gift is shopping bags. Every supermarket in Europe seems to have reusable shopping bags for only a Euro each. They are often made of excellent quality and are a nice practical and compact souvenir that anyone would appreciate.

So what do you like to bring back from your travels? Well at least what you like to bring back that’s legal to bring back?


About Adrienne Hew

Adrienne-Hew_BlackWhite.jpg

Adrienne Hew is a Certified Nutritionist and the Nutrition Heretic Podcast Host, but is best known online as an author of the Amazon Top 100 Bestseller 50 Ways to Eat Cock: Healthy Chicken Recipes with Balls! Receiving a certificate in Chinese dietetics in 2002 and her degree as a Certified Nutritionist in 2004, she has helped many clients and workshop attendees to decode their own health dilemmas by understanding the inconsistencies in conventional nutritional dogma. She currently resides in Hawaii with her husband and two children.